Family Mission Statement

"The Mission of the Anderson Family is to become and do all things necessary to be exalted as a family. To prepare for heaven, we will create a 'heaven on earth' by maintaining: A home where the spirit dwells, a home of LOVE, a home of FAITH, a home of ORDER, a home of LEARNING, a home of HEALTH, a home of WORK, and a home of PLAY-- where we are united in our obedience to God and enjoy true happiness."

Friday, April 21, 2017

WORK before PLAY Training

WORK BEFORE PLAY TRAINING
 
WHAT OUR FAMILY PRIVILEGES ARE:
A. NO PRIVILEGES (Red Light) before any work is done
B. BASIC PRIVILEGES (Yellow Light) are earned when their 5 daily chores (rocks) are done as far as can be:
  1. Play Inside alone or with family                                   2. Read extra books for fun alone or with family
*Our five daily chores are:
1. Family Scriptures   2. Clean Body & Room   3. Breakfast Clean up   4. Family Scriptures   5. Family Chore  
-If kids start playing or take off without their daily chores being done, I teach them the rock/sand principle and kindly ask them to get their chores done first. (kindness, patience, pure knowledge).  I remind them that they haven’t earned their yellow light/basic play privileges yet.  (I even have golf balls with those 5 topics written on them for them to put in a jar after they do each chore)
-For clean body and room, I have cards they turn over when they are done with each task.  The cards have pictures for make bed, say prayers, shower, get dressed, brush hair, brush teeth, tidy room, tidy bathroom. These have to be done before they can eat breakfast.
C. FULL PRIVILEGES (Green Light) are earned when they their daily chores are completely done:
  1. Play Outside+ Outings 2. Play with Friends 3. Technology 4. Sugar/Treats

OUR FAMILY CHORES
  1. PRINCIPLES about TEACHING CHILDREN RESPONSIBILITY:
1. Children can help provide for the physical needs of their families by helping their parents with their work, studying well in school, taking care of their clothing and other possessions, keeping themselves and their home clean and neat, and maintaining good health. (FAMILY GUIDEBOOK) https://www.lds.org/manual/family-guidebook/fulfilling-family-responsibilities?lang=eng
2. Order is essential in the heavens; if it were otherwise, chaos would rule. Order is just as necessary in our homes. President Kimball said, “Plan well and carry out your plan in an orderly and systematic manner”
3. Connect Work & Food... Gen 3:19 In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; 2 Thessalonians 3:10 For even when we were with you, we gave you this rule: "If a man will not work, he shall not eat.  (We have learned to just withhold snacks that day if they refuse to do their food chore, unless they do a makeup food chore so they don’t have any basic need un-met and feel abused/neglected… we also don’t allow snacks if meals aren’t eaten)
4. Connect Work & Money… “Have a simple family economy where children have specific chores or household duties and receive praise or other rewards commensurate to how well they do. Teach them the importance of avoiding debt and of earning, saving, and wisely spending money. Help them learn responsibility for their own temporal and spiritual self-reliance.”- Elder Ballard
5. Connect Work and Privileges… If homework isn't done, technology can be withheld. “The connection has to do with work and privileges. Watching television is a privilege that is earned by being responsible. A child who is irresponsible can lose a privilege.” (strengthening the family course- applying consequences)

    B. HOW WE APPLY THOSE PRINCIPLES:
1. WHAT our Family Chores are:
Each day they only have one family chore (in addition to helping with every meal clean up)
It rotates by day, but stays the same for each child each week. The 6 chore topics are:
Cook Breakfast, Laundry, Cook Lunch, Housework, Cook Dinner, Yard/Repair/Piano

2. HOW we PAY for family CHORES:
A. Work earns FOOD  (by the sweat of thy brow, thou shalt eat thy bread all the days of thy life)
If they refuse to do their food work (cooking or gardening), they don’t eat that meal. They help pick the meal that they cook- (we have pretty much the same meals each day of the week)
B. Work earns MONEY  (I am a homemaker, so I pay them for their housework job + their laundry job. They then have to pay 10% tithing and 10% savings, the rest goes towards clothes, fun, or extra learning (if they want to do a sport, they pay half) They sign up for housework at the beginning of the month and do the same job each week on their housework day. I pay $2 for them to wash, dry, fold, + put away their own laundry on their laundry day.
*Our weekly housework assignments are:
    1- Clean kitchen appliances ($1),   2- Vacuum Vehicles ($3),  3- Mop Kitchen Floor ($1-2),
    4-Vacuum House + Stairs ($3),   5- Clean Bathrooms ($6)    6-Wipe Furniture (couches, piano, desk) (50c)
*Our weekly yardwork assignment is to care for their garden+sign up for a different part of the yard for pay:
    1- Mow Lawn ($4 whole lawn or $1/section)    2- Edge Lawn ($2)       3- Weed Around House ($4 or $1/side)
                         4- Pick up Yard ($1)            5- Straighten & Sweep Garage ($2)
*We pay them once a week (every Saturday)
C. WORK develops TALENTS:  Piano or Repair Job in winter - they can choose.  If they choose piano, they pass off one song a week- on their piano day. If they choose repair, I give them something that needs to be done that week.
D. All Work earns PRIVILEGES (Work before Play- do your duty first)
*Every child helps with meal clean up- I started by training them in the one that is their level.
Once everyone was do everything, we made a daily rotation.  (Many hands makes light work)
    1- Wash Dishes   2- Load Dishwasher  3- Dry Dishes  4- Sweep Floor   5- Wipe Table   6- Wipe Island/Stove

E. GUNNY BAG
- If they leave anything out and I pick it up, I put it in a DI bag in the garage.
I take it to the DI once a month and let them look first to see if they want to buy anything out. (25c/item)

-If they want it before the DI check, they can buy it out early for 25c or an extra 5 min job

Obedience/Respect Training

OUR FAMILY VALUES
1. OBEDIENCE (receive instructions & obey quickly)
2. SACRIFICE (accept no answers & do duty before play)
3. LOVE (disagree respectfully, don’t emotionally or physically abuse people or property)
4. CLEANLINESS (Clean body & room and Leave no trace- tidy up after yourself)


SKILLS PARENTS & CHILDREN SHOULD DEVELOP
4 BASIC SKILLS PARENTS should develop:
  1. Teach “WHY” (give the reason) before the “what” (the instruction or no answer).  Always use persuasion, kindness, pure knowledge. This will prevent yourself from being a dictator. Children need to be TRAINED in respect- it doesn’t come naturally. TEACH them to right way to receive an instruction, accept a no answer, or accept a consequence (Role play looking at the parent in the eyes with a calm face and saying “yes mom” then going and doing it)... AND how to make an appeal (calmly ask the parent to reconsider their decision with an idea the child has thought of that they think is more fair).... THEN when they do ask to make an appeal, LISTEN and consider it if at all possible. (Beware of pride).
(Then patiently re-teach in every situation until it becomes a habit.  High expectations & love)
  1. Be Generous and caring about the welfare and happiness of your children. Before you give a No answer, first consider if you could possibly say “yes.”  ALSO, Be Generous in Rewards and SMALL with consequences to TRAIN not PUNISH.
  2. LISTEN until you understand them fully before you give a consequence (Seek first to understand, then to be understood).Consequence right and wrong not preferences or annoyances. Use programs as tools to teach not weapons to punish.
  3. Be meek/easy to be entreated... Always listen and consider their appeal if they can make it with a soft heart and a soft voice. Be agreeable and a peacemaker.


4 BASIC SKILLS CHILDREN should develop:
  1. Receive an Instruction (Calm face, look eyes, say yes mom, go and do, report back) “Children, obey your parents in the Lord: for this is right.” (Ephesians 6:1)
  2. Accept a No Answer (Calm face, look eyes, say OK, drop it- no arguing)
  3. Accept a Consequence (Calm face, look eyes, say OK, drop it- no arguing)
  4. Disagree Appropriately (Soft heart & voice, ask if they can make an appeal= suggest another fair idea for parent to consider)
*Each time they are obedient & respectful according to these 4 basic skills,
thank them and praise them so you feed the right behavior.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Family Laws

1. WORK        
Family Laws and Pre-Set Consequences help me to keep high expectations without using anger to motivate.  For years, I have used the phrase that work earns food, which was motivating, but sometimes it contradicted the basic duty of parents to providing food for their children- since it is a necessity of life.   We tried work earning play and work earning money which sometimes worked and sometimes didn't.  All year I have been struggling over what the family law should be... does work earn food or play or money?  I had an "a-ha" one night that it earns all 3!

Some work earns *FOOD (such as their assignment for helping prepare or grow the food)
1 exception-- they have to have a clean body and room before breakfast everyday.
(They are in charge of setting their own alarms + getting up and ready before family scripture study)
Some work earns PLAY/privileges (personal duties like their **family chore and homework)
They cannot go outside, play with friends, use technology, etc until their chore is done.
Some work earns ***MONEY (house/yard work that lightens parents' responsibilities)
I made a list of house and yardwork that needs to be done weekly and but a price on it that I was willing to pay them and let them sign up.  They kept it for the whole month long.

*Since I have 6 kids, they each help cook on their assigned breakfast day, lunch day, and dinner day. Sunday is cereal and leftovers or I cook. If they refuse to do their meal, they cannot eat that meal that day... it never happens.  My kids love helping me cook-they plan the meal with me so it's nutritious and something they like.  This way I don't have to restrict their food anymore. As long as they are willing to help cook, they can eat as much as they want. If the meal runs out, I just stay loaded with carrots, bread, milk, eggs, peanut butter as options to fill up or snack on.

**They only have one family chore a day.  It's either their breakfast day, their housework day, their lunch day, their laundry day, their dinner day, or their yardwork day.

***They earn money from, but they have to budget and pay for their own clothes, extra learning (½ sports), and fun.


2. HONORING PARENTS
I have been in massive training this summer with obedience, respect, and emotional control.
My goal is to be super kind yet not permissive of disrespect and defiance.
I've tried time outs, but what if the child is too big to take to time out or won't go?
This is the system we have worked out: (It is tough, but worth it)

There are 4 basic skills that children should have while interacting with parents
(This is from a book called, A House United)
1. Receive and Instruction (say "yes mom" and quickly obey and report back)
2. Receive a *Consequence (say "yes mom" and quickly do the consequence)
(jobs are not the consequence, they are a result of not receiving a consequence... see below for natural consequence ideas)
3. Receive a No Answer (say "yes mom" and drop the topic- no whining)
4. Disagree Appropriately (say "yes mom, may I suggest an idea I think is more fair"...no arguing)

If they cannot receive an instruction, consequence, or a no answer then I tell them they are 1 square below the privilege line. (which means they owe me 1 small job or act of obedience)
I then give the instruction a 2nd time.  If they don't receive and do it, they drop 2 more squares below the privilege line.
I then give the instruction a 3rd time.  If they don't receive and do it, they drop 3 more squares below the privilege line.

Usually they will obey an instruction by the 3rd time, if not- I just drop the topic and they have no privileges until they've done 30 minutes of work for refusing that instruction.  In the meantime, if I have to give different instructions before they have earned those back, they can drop even more if they don't obey those instructions.   The quicker they soften their heart, the quicker they get privileges back.  I give them a list of jobs to chose from.  They can pick from my 5 minute job list (1 square), my 20 minute job list (4 squares), or my 60 minute job lists (12 squares).  They can also move up a square every time they obey an instruction right away that I give one out naturally.


*Consequence ideas:
-Don’t eat meal= Don’t get snacks
-Eat before prayer=wait 5 minutes to eat.
-Fight over toy/game=lose toy or pulled out of game for a period of time
-Name calling/verbal abuse= say 10 kind words or write letter of forgiveness + kindness or soap in mouth (swearing)
-Hurt someone=time out
-Bad for babysitter=pay babysitter

Sunday, May 1, 2016

Joy Balance

Children need parents and Parents need children.
They bring a balance to each other which creates joy.
I am thankful my kids keep me playing 
and they will be thankful one day that I keep them working!



Communicating with Love

Christ is the perfect example of loving others. 
Charity- the pure love of Christ- takes so much prayer and constant effort.
Here are some ways we are working on communicating with love as a family:
(This is from the Strengthening the Family Manual- Communicating with Love lesson)
Eager to Serve,  Slow to Condemn,   
Appreciative,  Forgiving of Others
Compassionate, Loving of Children,  
Considerate of Family, 
Willing to Sacrifice, Return Good for Evil

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

Winter Activities

Sadie and Mollie learned how to bake and decorate 
fancy cakes for grandma Anneli's 90th birthday party.

Myriam learned how to play "Finlandia" on the piano for 
Grandma Anneli's 90th birthday party.
It is grandma's favorite song because she is from Finland.


Donny took Mollie on a fabulous evening
cross country ski date to up Green Canyon to the yurt.


 Packer and Mom went on an all day ski date
 at Beaver Mountain
(Paid for by Packer for all his reading at school
in the "Beat the Teach" Competition)
Donny spent as many Saturday's as he could ice fishing.
He's getting good at cooking it too!




Myriam bagpiped at her first funeral and earned great money.
It was freezing, but she did well.

Myriam did some amazing art work
that was displayed at Spring Creek Middle School.

Paula, a girl from Columbia who lived with my parents
got married in the Salt Lake Temple



Wednesday, November 18, 2015

HOMEMAKING CAREER

Here are some of my favorite quotes that influenced my choice for 
HOMEMAKING as my CAREER:

Susan W. Tanner (Young Women General President)- “Strengthening Future Mothers”
Several years ago my husband and I asked our children what they liked about the recent general conference. Our then-16-year-old daughter was elated. She said, “I loved it! I loved hearing inspired, intelligent prophets and leaders affirm motherhood.” Then she told us that this was one of the disturbing anxieties in her life: “I just don’t hear it from anyone—not at seminary, not in Young Women, and definitely not at school; nowhere except at home.”
I would like to affirm motherhood, to talk about the newest phrase in our Young Women theme: “be prepared to strengthen home and family.”
Homemaking skills are becoming a lost art. I worry about this. When we lose the homemakers in a society, we create an emotional homelessness much like street homelessness, with similar problems of despair, drugs, immorality, and lack of self-worth… So we must teach homemaking skills, including practical ones such as cooking, sewing, budgeting, and beautifying. We must let young women know that homemaking skills are honorable and can help them spiritually as well as temporally. Making a home appealing physically will encourage loved ones to want to be there and will help create the kind of atmosphere that is conducive to the Spirit. Sunday lessons, Mutual, and Personal Progress are all programs that provide times and ways to teach these necessary lessons. 

The Family Proclamation
            By divine design, fathers are to preside over their families in love and righteousness and are responsible to provide the necessities of life and protection for their families. Mothers are primarily responsible for the nurture of their children.

President Hinckley- “Standing for Something”
“Women who make a house a home make a far greater contribution to society than those who command large armies or stand at the head of impressive corporations. Who can put a price tag on the influence a mother has on her children, a grandmother on her posterity, or aunts and sisters on their extended family?

Julie Beck(Relief Society General President)- “Mothers Who Know”
               Mothers who know are nurturers. This is their special assignment and role under the plan of happiness.5 To nurture means to cultivate, care for, and make grow. Therefore, mothers who know create a climate for spiritual and temporal growth in their homes. Another word for nurturing is homemaking. Homemaking includes cooking, washing clothes and dishes, and keeping an orderly home. Home is where women have the most power and influence; therefore, Latter-day Saint women should be the best homemakers in the world. 
            Mothers who know do less. They permit less of what will not bear good fruit eternally. They allow less media in their homes, less distraction, less activity that draws their children away from their home. Mothers who know are willing to live on less and consume less of the world’s goods in order to spend more time with their children—more time eating together, more time working together, more time reading together, more time talking, laughing, singing, and exemplifying. These mothers choose carefully and do not try to choose it all.

President Spencer W. Kimball- “John and Mary Beginning Life Together”
Mary, with your wholesome attitude toward family life, I know you will desire to devote your life to your home and family; so when you resign your job and no longer have that income to spend upon yourself, it will mean many adjustments for you; but I understand you have considered all those things and are willing. You see, Mary, it was never intended by the Lord that married women should compete with men in employment. They have a far greater and more important service to render, and so you give up your employment and settle down to become the queen of the little new home that you will proceed to transform into a heaven for John, this man whom you adore. John will work hard and will do his best to provide you with comforts and even luxuries later, but this is the perfect way, to “start from scratch” together.
And Mary, you have much to learn in these coming months. Perhaps you, like most of the other young women of the nation, have prepared yourself for a career that you will not follow. One college president said about ninety-two percent of all the girls in his college studied languages and mathematics and business, and then when they were married found that they not only had limited use for their specialized training, but they had also failed to train for the great career to which they were now to dedicate their lives. Mary, you are to become a career woman in the greatest career on earth—that of homemaker, wife, and mother. And so, if you have failed to prepare for motherhood and homemaking when you could, you may make up somewhat by devoting yourself to those subjects now. In your spare time you could now study child psychology and child discipline, the fundamentals of nursing, the art of teaching, particularly how to tell stories and teach children; and you will want to get all the theory as well as the practice now in cooking, sewing, budgeting, and buying.
John’s limited income will spread far if you can learn to buy efficiently and cook expertly so that there will never be waste. And his small income can go far if you learn to make some of your own clothes and those of the children and utilize scraps and pick up bargains. And if you learn the rudiments of nursing, you may be able to save much in doctor and hospital costs by recognizing symptoms and treating minor afflictions, and you may also have the satisfaction of even saving the lives of your own precious family by your being able to do practical nursing. And so your economies will largely make up for the loss of your own income.
You wouldn’t want to work outside the home anyway, Mary, for women are expected to earn the living only in emergencies, and you must know that many are the broken homes resulting when women leave their posts at home. You see, if both husband and wife are working away from home and come home tired, it is very easy for unpleasantness and misunderstandings to arise. And so, Mary, you will remain at home, making it attractive and heavenly, and when John comes home tired, you will be fresh and pleasant; the house will be orderly; the dinner will be tempting; and life will have real meaning.
D. Todd Christofferson- “The Moral Force of Women- 2013”
A pernicious philosophy that undermines women’s moral influence is the devaluation of marriage and of motherhood and homemaking as a career. Some view homemaking with outright contempt, arguing it demeans women and that the relentless demands of raising children are a form of exploitation.8 They ridicule what they call “the mommy track” as a career. This is not fair or right. We do not diminish the value of what women or men achieve in any worthy endeavor or career—we all benefit from those achievements—but we still recognize there is not a higher good than motherhood and fatherhood in marriage. There is no superior career, and no amount of money, authority, or public acclaim can exceed the ultimate rewards of family. Whatever else a woman may accomplish, her moral influence is no more optimally employed than here.

President Ezra Taft Benson- “To the Mothers in Zion”
Again, in the Doctrine and Covenants, we read: "Women have claim on their husbands for their maintenance, until their husbands are taken" (D&C 83:2). This is the divine right of a wife and mother. She cares for and nourishes her children at home. Her husband earns the living for the family, which makes this nourishing possible. With that claim on their husbands for their financial support, the counsel of the Church has always been for mothers to spend their full time in the home in rearing and caring for their children.
We realize also that some of our choice sisters are widowed and divorced and that others find themselves in unusual circumstances where, out of necessity, they are required to work for a period of time. But these instances are the exception, not the rule.
In a home where there is an able-bodied husband, he is expected to be the breadwinner. Sometimes we hear of husbands who, because of economic conditions, have lost their jobs and expect their wives to go out of the home and work even though the husband is still capable of providing for his family. In these cases, we urge the husband to do all in his power to allow his wife to remain in the home caring for the children while he continues to provide for his family the best he can, even though the job be is able secure may not be ideal and family budgeting will have to be tighter.
Our beloved prophet Spencer W. Kimball had much to say about the role of mothers in the home and their callings and responsibilities. I am impressed tonight to share with you some of his inspired pronouncements. I fear that much of his counsel has gone unheeded, and families have suffered because of it. But I stand this evening as a second witness to the truthfulness of what President Spencer W. Kimball said. He spoke as a true prophet of God.
President Kimball declared: "Women are to take care of the family--the Lord has so stated--to be an assistant to the husband, to work with him, but not to earn the living, except in unusual circumstances. Men ought to be men indeed and earn the living under normal circumstances" (Teachings of Spencer W. Kimball, p. 318 ).
President Kimball continues: "Too many mothers work away from home to furnish sweaters and music lessons and trips and fun for their children. Too many women spend their time in socializing, in politicking, in public services when they should be home to teach and train and receive and love their children into security" (Teachings of Spencer W. Kimball, p. 319).
Remember the counsel of President Kimball to John and Mary: "Mary, you are to become a career woman in the greatest career on earth--that of homemaker, wife, and mother. It was never intended by the Lord that married women should compete with men in employment. They have a far greater and more important service to render.
Again President Kimball speaks: "The husband is expected to support his family and only in an emergency should a wife secure outside employment. Her place is in the home, to build the home into a haven of delight.
"Numerous divorces can be traced directly to the day when the wife left the home and went out into the world into employment. Two incomes raise the standard of living beyond its norm. Two spouses working prevent the complete and proper home life, break into the family prayers, create an independence which is not cooperative, causes distortion, limits the family, and frustrates the children already born" (Spencer W. Kimball, San Antonio Fireside, Dec. 3, 1977, pp. 9-10 ).
Finally President Kimball counsels: "I beg of you, you who could and should be bearing and rearing a family: Wives, come home from the typewriter, the laundry, the nursing, come home from the factory, the cafe. No career approaches in importance that of wife, homemaker, mother--cooking meals, washing dishes, making beds for one's precious husband and children. Come home, wives, to your husbands. Make home a heaven for them. Come home, wives, to your children, born and unborn. Wrap the motherly cloak about you and, unembarrassed, help in a major role to create the bodies for the immortal souls who anxiously await.
"When you have fully complemented your husband in home life and borne the children, growing up full of faith, integrity, responsibility, and goodness, then you have achieved your accomplishment supreme, without peer, and you will be the envy [of all] through time and eternity" (Spencer W. Kimball, San Antonio Fireside, Dec. 3, 1977, pp. 11-12).
President Kimball spoke the truth. His words are prophetic.
Mothers in Zion, your God-given roles are so vital to your own exaltation and to the salvation and exaltation of your family. A child needs a mother more than all the things money can buy. Spending time with your children is the greatest gift of all.

Howard W. Hunter- Prepare for Honorable Employment
I completed my undergraduate work and entered law school. I took classes at night because it was necessary to be employed during the daytime. These were not easy years for us, but desires are usually accomplished if we are willing to make a determined effort. Needless to say, I had the help and support of my wife. She remained a homemaker and cared for our children. What she gave in love, encouragement, frugality, and companionship was far in excess of any material contribution she might have made by taking employment.
Our wives deserve great credit for the heavy work load they carry day in and day out within our homes. No one expends more energy than a devoted mother and wife. In the usual arrangement of things, however, it is the man to whom the Lord has assigned the breadwinner’s role.
There are impelling reasons for our sisters to plan toward employment also. We want them to obtain all the education and vocational training possible before marriage. If they become widowed or divorced and need to work, we want them to have dignified and rewarding employment. If a sister does not marry, she has every right to engage in a profession that allows her to magnify her talents and gifts.

James E Faust- “How Near to the Angels”
You cannot trust the many conflicting voices that clamor about what women should or should not do in today’s society. Some of the loudest voices are echoes of those others who are out of harmony with themselves and out of tune with life in general rather than being unhappy with their role as women.
Do not be deceived in your quest to find happiness and an identity of your own. Entreating voices may tell you that what you have seen your mothers and grandmothers do is old-fashioned, unchallenging, boring, and drudgery. It may have been old-fashioned and perhaps routine; at times it was drudgery. But your mothers and grandmothers have sung a song that expressed the highest love and the noblest of womanly feelings. They have been our nurturers and our teachers. They have sanctified the work, transforming drudgery into the noblest enterprises.
Homemaking is whatever you make of it. Every day brings satisfaction along with some work which may be frustrating, routine, and unchallenging. But it is the same in the law office, the dispensary, the laboratory, or the store. There is, however, no more important job than homemaking. As C. S. Lewis said, “A housewife’s work … is the one for which all others exist.” 10

President Hinckley- “To the women of the Church”
Some years ago President Benson delivered a message to the women of the Church. He encouraged them to leave their employment and give their individual time to their children. I sustain the position which he took.
Nevertheless, I recognize, as he recognized, that there are some women (it has become very many in fact) who have to work to provide for the needs of their families. To you I say, do the very best you can. I hope that if you are employed full-time you are doing it to ensure that basic needs are met and not simply to indulge a taste for an elaborate home, fancy cars, and other luxuries. The greatest job that any mother will ever do will be in nurturing, teaching, lifting, encouraging, and rearing her children in righteousness and truth. None other can adequately take her place.
It is well-nigh impossible to be a full-time homemaker and a full-time employee. I know how some of you struggle with decisions concerning this matter. I repeat, do the very best you can. You know your circumstances, and I know that you are deeply concerned for the welfare of your children. Each of you has a bishop who will counsel with you and assist you. If you feel you need to speak with an understanding woman, do not hesitate to get in touch with your Relief Society president.

President Hinckley-“Live up to your inheritance”
I salute most warmly and sincerely you dedicated and wonderful homemakers. I have only respect for the title “housewife.”
I clipped this from the Wall Street Journal, titled “The Most Creative Job in the World”:

“It involves taste, fashion, decorating, recreation, education, transportation, psychology, romance, cuisine, designing, literature, medicine, handicraft, art, horticulture, economics, government, community relations, pediatrics, geriatrics, entertainment, maintenance, purchasing, direct mail, law, accounting, religion, energy and management. Anyone who can handle all those has to be somebody special. She is. She’s a homemaker.” (3 June 1983.)